Motor rebuild

Discussion in 'Small Block Tech' started by softtop65, Apr 14, 2019.

  1. softtop65

    softtop65 Active Member

    Just a question here for the small block gearheads specifically the '65 vintage 300, I would like to know a ballpark figure what it would/should cost today to outsource to a shop to rebuild the lil guy and basically all stock,.. also would it be a better alternative to find and rebuild a later up to say 1970 Buick 350 and could this possibly save on overall cost? I am in the Norcal area if that could be a factor also, as most everything here will cost more. Thanks in advance for any good feedback on this!
     
  2. alec296

    alec296 i need another buick

    I don’t think you will save much money rebuilding a 350 over a 300. Your doing basically the same work. The 350 will probably have a little more power.
    Im gonna guess its about 2-2500 full rebuild now. With heads redone
     
  3. softtop65

    softtop65 Active Member

    Thank you for the response and it gives me a starting point. I have checked around locally and find the shops I have talked with wont even touch a Buick engine, especially one that is 50+ years old. That is why I was thinking of going a few years newer, also the 350 may be a bit easier to source new parts.?
    I just want a driver cruiser, not looking for speed but a dependable good driver. I will continue my research here, and hope I can find a local business that will be willing to take on the 300 as a first option.
     
  4. Mark Demko

    Mark Demko Well-Known Member

    Id stay away from those shops, machine work is machine work, IF you know what your doing, and you have a passion for it (machine work) a Buick is no different from a flat head Ford, they ALL have specs. tolerances, etc.
    I paint cars for a living, that would be like me saying " I don't paint Kia's or Mercedes's"
    I hope you find someplace that's reputable, it kinda pisses me off that shops wont work on older iron.
    Did you happen to ask "why" they wont work on a Buick?
     
  5. softtop65

    softtop65 Active Member

    Hi Mark, Thanks for the feedback, I only wish I could avoid the Machine shops but I am not in a position with age and physical health issues to do any of the work myself. I still believe I will be able to find a good reputable place here locally, but all the well known local shops are so busy and overwhelmed with Chevy and Ford products they do not need to even consider the less appreciated BOP products. Asking why is like, "well we have a hard time finding parts," or there is a very small market for replacement parts for older Buick and so we don't get enough call to do the engine work for those. It truly does piss me off also.
    I hold out hope I will find a good place to get this work done soon.
     
    Mark Demko likes this.
  6. Dr. Roger

    Dr. Roger Stock enthusiast

    So I was able to do a complete rebuild of my Buick 350-4v (pistons, crank, cam, rods...everything inside the engine was replaced with new) myself except for the machine work. I think I was out about $1500 total. Kunz racing engines (in Arkansas) did the machine work for me, as their specificity is rebuilding classic car engines and building crate engines for racing. I replaced everything with stock (mostly from Autozone), so it was a lot cheaper as the stock-rated parts are usually cheaper than the hot roddy parts. Still runs like a bat out of hell, but not going to win any races against a 455.

    65 300 is probably a different animal since there isn't the large following like the 350 and 455, so figure the parts price will be greater, but machine work and re-assembly would be the same price. If it doesn't need boring and only needs a new set of rings and bearings (no pistons, crank, or cam replaced), the total cost would be substantially lower.

    Given machine shops that work on engines are a dying breed, I figure most will bend over backwards for your business. 20 years ago, there were 5-6 machine shops I could choose from in my home town, but now I have to drive 1 1/2 hours to the nearest one. Paid $75 to have a Ford block bored back then, now it is $300.
     
  7. 1987Regal

    1987Regal Well-Known Member

    You know reading over this makes me think back on my engine. Really really make sure whoever does the machine work is really damn good because I had somebody that did machine work has done reputable stuff and failed on my my Buick 350 heads I ended up putting a third cam in my engine because the guy did not do machine work correctly to the heads to match the cam. I had to pay another machine shop six hundred and some dollars to turn down the valve guides go back through the heads and fix it and my issue was the cam was so big the valve spring retainers were hitting the valve seals. No Joke .not not to mention this did not include other parts including having the block recleaned, cam bearings, a crank and bearings,and etc. The first cam developed a tick I thought it was just freak. I put a second cam in it not knowing any better the motor Ran but didn't run a hundred percent I thought it just need to be retuned. then I decide to put high compression pistons in and that's when I found out the cam was bad again and why. I hope no one has to go through what I did (im sure I'm not the only one) and I hope your build is a 110% success. Josh
     
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  8. Entropy11

    Entropy11 Active Member

    Totally agree with Josh's post above... Although it's always hard reading stories like that.

    If places are put-off by it being "old" or a Buick, that's all you need to know to turn around and walk (run) out their door. Try to find some people at a local car show and see what they have to say. Stop at any repair shop where you notice an old muscle car occasionally parked and ask them what they know and who they know. When you find the right place you'll sleep easier knowing things will be in good hands.

    Good luck on your search,
    Dennis
     
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  9. 70skylark350

    70skylark350 Well-Known Member

    I have a machine shop building my 350 now and I am in over $5,000.00 OUCH.
    that's parts and labor. the custom pistons alone were $1,200.00
     
    Mark Demko likes this.
  10. Dr. Roger

    Dr. Roger Stock enthusiast

    I got the stock pistons with rings for $165 from Titan engines, so yeah, aftermarket hot rod parts are much more pricey.
     
  11. Mark Demko

    Mark Demko Well-Known Member

    What kind of pistons for 1200.00?
     
  12. 70skylark350

    70skylark350 Well-Known Member

    JE
     
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  13. softtop65

    softtop65 Active Member

    Thanks Dr. Roger for you're response, very good information.
     
  14. softtop65

    softtop65 Active Member

    Hey Josh, that is quite the story, and hope I do avoid anything like this happening, I will be posting more later on what I end up doing and the challenges or issues I may encounter.
     
  15. softtop65

    softtop65 Active Member

    Thanks Dennis on the feedback, I agree I will not do business with anyone who will talk down the Buick or try to get me to make drastic changes etc. I did locate a local car restoration guy (thru a local car show) and his good friend who both build custom and or stock 50's and 60's classic's ., so we are doing some talking and I may have a good local one man machine shop lined up for the work.
     
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